Michael Thomas' Website

Records

Labels - J

Home Page  Records British Dance Bands Sound Files Contact Me

British 78rpm record labels whose name begins with J. Using the letter links below you can see pages for other letters.
Unless otherwise noted, all research and images are my own, but as you will see, many other people have helped, especially with the label catalogue listings.

All images are thumbnails, so clicking on them will display a full-sized image. Where the label name is a link, clicking it will take you to a new page with more information and, in most cases, an attempt to list all issues on that label.

  B     D     F     H      K     M                   W &  Z

Label Label Description Images
Jamco Jamco Records of 18, King Street, Wigan were produced by Wm. Grimes of Wigan and specialosed in Brass Band recordings. Bill Gaskell, formerly manager of Wingates Temperance Band started this label in March 1950 and Harry Mortimer, the cornet virtuoso was later the musical adviser. Some were recorded off-air BBC broadcasts (with the BBC's permission). The records appear to have been pressed by Levy's Oriole records.
Jaycee Jaycee records were pressed by Crystalate from their Imperial masters during the mid-1920s.  The masters date from around 1926  and the records were sold in the Co-Op. They are pretty rare and the series, which was in a J-100 range, was quite short-lived, probably less than 20 different records. Based on the value on the copyright stamp (5/8d), the records probably cost about 1/6, the same price as the Imperial issues..
Jazz these two labels were produced by the Jazz Appreciation Society of Newark, and both seem to have been short-lived ventures.
The green-and-white label reissued some rare 1920s American jazz recordings originally from Paramount, which the black-and-white label issued contemporary recordings, usually of New Orleans jazz.
Thanks to Bill Dean-Myatt for providing the label images.

Jazz Collector Founded in May 1949, this label specialized in reissuing rare jazz classics from the 1920s. It was made for the Jazz Art Society of 65, Bramber Road, West Kensington, London. The catalogue numbers started at L-1 and ran for over 100 issues. All were dubs taken from the originals and vary somewhat in quality. The records cost 7/6.
Jazz Man Tom Cundall, of Broadhurst Gardens, London, produced these records, which use mainly, if not totally, American imported recordings. There were 22 different discs and they were issued during 1941 & 1942.

Thanks to Bill Dean-Myatt for providing the label images.
Jazz Parade There were just 16 of these 10" discs issued in 1950 & 1951 and couple of 12" discs as well.

Thanks to Bill Dean-Myatt for providing the label images.
JLCO There is actually no such label by this name. The attractive label pictured on the right is, in realiity ILCO; the letter "I" having a tag at the bottom which makes it look like a "J".
 
John Bull Another very patriotic-looking label, but produced in Germany on the "tally-man" system. This was sold door-to-door and the customer would get a "free" gramophone after signing an agreement to buy a set number of records (about 50) over the next year, at 2/6 each. John Bull records first appeared in 1909 using masters from Beka and Favorite, and later on, other German and British companies became involved, until the company ceased in 1913 and all old stock bought by the Albion record Company.
John King Films My example dates from the 1940s. This seems to be a semi-private enterprise, based in Brighton.
Jolly Boys A 6" disc recorded and pressed by the Gramophone Company in 1926 using masters also available generally on Homo-Baby. It was short-lived with a catalogue running from 101 to 110. All recordings were acoustic and the dance records are played by an orchestra and in a style more suited to overtures and marches.
It is presumed these were made to be sold in a specific store, but it is not currently known which.  
Thanks to Bill Dean-Myatt for providing the label photo.

Here is a full listing of this label, based on the research by the lates Arthur Badrock & Frank Andrews. Note: All the recordings are directed by George W. Byng.

Cat No.  Matrix No Title Artists on label Rec. Date
101 EE-8044-1
EE-8047-1
Valencia (one-step)
Carmen (march) (Bizet)
Dance Orchestra
Orchestra
Mar 5th, 1926,
102 EE-7947-1
EE-8338-1
Hearts And Flowers (descriptive)
Valentine (one step)
Orchestra 
Dance Orchestra
Feb. 22nd, 1926
Apr 26th, 1926
103 EE-8218-1
EE-8357-1
The Bohemian Girl (overture) (Balfe)
Barcelona (one step)
Orchestra
Dance Orchestra
Mar 30th, 1926
Apr 27th, 1926
104 EE-8149-1
EE-8155-1
Light Cavalry (overture) (Suppe)
Every Step Towards Killarney (waltz)
Orchestra
Dance Orchestra
Mar 19th, 1926
105 EE-8268-1
EE-8274-1
I Miss My Swiss (fox trot)
Liberty Bell (march)
Dance Orchestra
Orchestra
Apr 15th, 1926
106 EE-8150-1
EE-8272-1
Largo (Handel)
Maybe (fox trot)
Orchestra
Dance Orchestra
Mar 19th, 1926
Apr 15th, 1926
107 EE-8051-1
EE-8339-1
Narcissus (Nevin)
Mignonette (waltz)
Orchestra
Dance Orchestra
Mar 5th, 1926
Apr 26th, 1926
108 EE-8046-1
EE-8216-1
Poet And Peasant (overture) (Suppe)
Picador (one-step)
Orchestra
Dance Orchestra
Mar 5th, 1926
Mar 30th, 1926
109 EE-8048-1
EE-8269-1
Stephanie Gavotte (Czibulka)
Sonya (fox trot)
Orchestra
Dance Orchestra
Mar 5th, 1926
Apr 15th, 1926
110 EE-8147-1
EE-8215-1
Tannhauser (Wagner)
The Tin-Can Fusiliers (fox trot)
Orchestra 
Dance Orchestra
Mar 19th, 1926
Mar 30th, 1926
110 EE-8335-1
EE-8215-1
Tannhauser (Wagner)
The Tin-Can Fusiliers (fox trot)
Orchestra 
Dance Orchestra
Apr 26th, 1926
Mar 30th, 1926
Joyphone No Joyphone records have yet been found, but a record sleeve for one turned up in Australia.  
Jumbo The first Jumbo records appear in 1908, as a cheap equivalent to Fonotipia. The records were initially made in Germany, but subsequently pressed by Crystalate and later the Mead Works in Hertfordshire. Masters came from Fonotipia, Lindstrom and Beka. The catalogue numbering started at 1 (often not shown on the label initially, but stamped into the smooth area around the label) and ran up to about 1580 in 1919,  when the label name was changed to Venus (q.v.).
Jupiter It is thought that there were only 2 different Jupiter records issued, both by bass-baritone Charles Knowles, probably dating to the early 1920s.

  B     D     F     H      K     M                   W &  Z

To Top of Page